About the Embassy – Atlanta Bitcoin Embassy

Conference on Bitcoin to Be Held in Atlanta, GA in October This Year

Conference on Bitcoin to Be Held in Atlanta, GA in October This Year submitted by fabgifts to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Crypto-Currency Conference Bitcoin and the Future of Money Conference to Be Held the Next Month in Atlanta

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Let's Talk Bitcoin! Brunch Meetup! - Let's Talk Bitcoin! Conference Meetup Group (Atlanta, GA)

Let's Talk Bitcoin! Brunch Meetup! - Let's Talk Bitcoin! Conference Meetup Group (Atlanta, GA) submitted by gamerandy to letstalkbitcoin [link] [comments]

Crypto-Currency Conference "Bitcoin and the Future of Money" coming to Atlanta in October

Crypto-Currency Conference submitted by nullspot to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Crypto-Currency Conference: Bitcoin and the Future of Money - October 23, 2013 - Atlanta

Crypto-Currency Conference: Bitcoin and the Future of Money - October 23, 2013 - Atlanta submitted by sexyloser1128 to Libertarian [link] [comments]

Crypto-Currency Conference: Bitcoin and the Future of Money - October 23, 2013 - Atlanta

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/r/Anarcho_Capitalism [spam filtered] Crypto-Currency Conference: Bitcoin and the Future of Money - October 23, 2013 - Atlanta

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Crypto-Currency Conference: Bitcoin and the Future of Money - October 23, 2013 - Atlanta

Crypto-Currency Conference: Bitcoin and the Future of Money - October 23, 2013 - Atlanta submitted by sexyloser1128 to Anarcho_Capitalism [link] [comments]

Crypto-Currency Conference: Bitcoin and the Future of Money - October 23, 2013 - Atlanta

submitted by sexyloser1128 to Economics [link] [comments]

P-REP Proposal; ICON, 20% exposure in top crypto event of 2020, reach 100+ universities/corporate partners (BETTER THAN SLICED BREAD), organized by MouseBelt.

Summary:
Event site: https://www.ri2020.io/
Event date: May 18th, 2020
P-PREP Commitment Date: April 30th, 2020
Telegram: u/markusreisner
We believe we have a strong proposition to market ICON in a meaningful way to some of the largest communities in crypto.
The MouseBelt team has the largest global network of over 100+ universities in 20+ countries. Over the last few months, 10+ university blockchain events we were working with got canceled for obvious reasons.
Due to that fact, and our understanding of our reach we decided to launch a virtual conference. Since April 10th here is what happened:
MouseBelt will invest over $70k+ into this event. We would like to have fellow P-Reps invest $20k (this will go 100% to BlockTV production cost).
The benefit to the ICON community will be:
Background:
MouseBelt is a popular blockchain ecosystem consisting of multiple parts:
MouseBelt as ICON developers:
Our engineering team has implemented token assets on ZenSports (SPORTS), the first STO on the ICON network, and GrowYourBase, the #1 IRC2 application token in market capitalization on the ICON network.
Currently, we are developing the Balanced network in concert with ICX_Station, PARROT9, and Iconosphere. Balanced will bring synthetic assets backed by ICX to the ICON network, as well as tokenized staked ICX. This can assist with both a stable asset for payments, and a base for other DeFi applications
MouseBelt as a P-Rep:
We have been a Main P-Rep most of the time since decentralization of the network and so far had utilized our funds for student education.
Such as the “ICON in a box” workshops and the Milwaukee Blockchain Conference, which we sponsored in a direct ICX payment and the second annual payment for UCLA’s blockchain engineering course.
REIMAGINE2020, Conference details:
Conferences have always been an integral part of the blockchain space to promote projects in the industry.
With recent evolutions around the globe, things have changed. They either got canceled or delayed.
We have created REIMAGINE2020, a virtual conference.
Shared by the ICON Foundation on April 18.
We can effectively and efficiently promote ICON to the world through Reiamgine2020 | BlockTV. The driving force behind the conference is: highest quality of Content matched with the best production quality for Video. The funds will allow MouseBelt to promote ICON logo/branding throughout the conference/programming for straight 72 hr of live streaming. Additionally, we have the opportunity to properly place ICON logo/branding in highly favorable on-screen placements (tickers/commercials/plugs and continuous branding) reaching 5M viewers globally. ICX Station is providing a Keynote to drive global interest.
Confirmed partners
Schedule & Format
Production Status
Audience
In addition to the communities of our confirmed partners and universities we are targeting:
1. Viewers - Tuning into the livestream, attending a workshop, or watching the content post-conference.
2. Participants - Speakers, partners, and sponsors
3. As far as hard data for "attendees" we have two signals:
submitted by patrickMouse to helloicon [link] [comments]

Today in History 02/08





submitted by Pickup_your_nuts to ConservativeKiwi [link] [comments]

TabConf Monero Report

TabConf Monero Report
"I appeal to you, brothers and sisters, in the name of our Lord Satoshi Nakamoto, that all of you agree with one another in what you say and that there be no divisions among you, but that you be perfectly united in mind and thought." - 1 Corinthians 1:10
Fellow Disciples of Privacy,
I have returned to tell the tale my pilgrimage to Atlanta, GA where I spread the gospel of our devout belief in financial privacy. I was there from Feb 7-11 and the conference itself was Feb 8-10. Here is the link to the event website.
Feb 8
On my way to the 1st day of the event I talked to a woman with a booth outside holding a "Free Stress Test" sign. She was representing Scientology and informed me of the practice of Dianetics. She explained that Dianetics is the process of identifying negative memories in the brain and removing them so they cannot be stimulated to be re-experienced. She denied that such process could be performed by stimulating the amygdala with an electrode.
I went on my way to the workshop event at TabConf where I learned about IBM's Hyperledger Fabric and stepped into Bitpay's workshop where they were working with the "Bitcoin-Core" client. Later I met up with midipoet and learned from a passing group that the host of this conference, Georgia State University, had a large computer network that performed substantial rendering for their video production in the Entrepreneurship Department. I went to meet with the director of that department, Elizabeth Strickler and asked if they had ever considered subsidizing the cost of that hardware by mining Monero with it. She was curious about this idea but ultimately the University pays for the electricity and that was beyond the scope of her authority. She told me she would connect me with higher up directors.
After lunch I sat in the Hashgraph (Hedera) meetup.
The pre-conference party at the Beer Garden Bar happened a few hours later where I met 2 members of the Church of Monero and several other OG crypto community members. I talked with rehrar, his better looking half, and midipoet discussing the state of the Monero community. I didn't go to sleep until ~2 am, grabbing food at a late night Atlanta diner with a few other people.
Feb 9
In the morning I caught rehrar's talk.
Later I went and talked with Paul Puey paullinator from Edge about his experience implementing Monero into their platform. He explained to me that it has been very challenging for them to implement and maintain Monero functionality. The frequent network upgrades and unique code structure "almost require a full time Monero engineer." [Maybe this could be a decentralized position the Monero community could crowdfund?] I expressed my concern and understanding of the challenges Edge has faced regarding Monero and assured him that I would bring this concern to the rest of the community.
As I walked around the booths at TabConf, I also met with Brian Hoffman of Open Bazaar where I asked about Monero integration, possible i2p data transmission layer, and Discord-like chat functionality in their new Haven app. He expressed similar challenges for Monero integration and I proposed that he contact binaryfate to integrate one way XMR -> BTC functionality with xmr.to's API to get around the need to maintain a Monero wallet while maintaining some financial privacy.
I learned about the struggle of being a woman in Blockchain at the "Women in Blockchain Panel".
I was there for (Chris Derose's) brighton36's shocking reveal in his presentation on Professionalism in Blockchain.
Daniel Krawisz danielkrawisz then taught us about using Mass Hypnosis through costly signalling to communicate Bitcoin to the world.
Mike In Space showed us several controversial Bitcoin Car Talk videos.
Diego rehrar eating apple sauce!
Eventually we all met up at Skyline Park for dinner, drinks and a rooftop party.
Me at the rooftop bar with a view of Atlanta
We were all out late partying. TabConf had an open tab all night and your TabConf ticket got you in free.
@ComEatMeBra (Telegram) from the Church of Monero found this Hymnal with an M inscribed on it while walking through the street.
@joshuam_ (Twitter) from Decred was out late with us partying.
Feb 10
On this Sunday, the Church of Monero held is largest "in real life" Mass with five people from TabConf total participating.
Chris Derose, Daniel Krawisz, and Xeagu
We introduced two new members to the Church of Monero and had four people plus me participate in Mass.
I went to listen to the Lightning Network Panel and have been interested in this technology since I heard about the Lightning Network Torch Ceremony on Twitter where people send a "Torch" to each other using Lightning Network transactions. This ritual is similar to the Church of Monero Mass.
Afterwards I stayed for the CEO/Founder Panel with Paul Puey, Brian Hoffman, Stephen Pair, and Wayne Vaughan (from left to right).
I think the CEO Panel was my favorite segment of the conference. The conference really put together a diverse speaker set and appropriately organized the CEO Panel in a way that was conducive to understand many different perspectives within the ecosystem. Estimates for victory in this crypto revolution range from 4 to 20 years. Private Key Custody will be an important variable in this process.
After the panel, I listened to Kevin Pham, Chris Derose, rm0rf, and several others further discuss the sovereignty of crypto nation states and between them the competition to develop the best blockchain tech.
If you like this work, please donate Monero: 43zN7eLtPB5iBgnZKv9p6BhtE56cmCwkjM1kJAtznFoEfpNjpdAGU3TLwBkhsw7gLmHSR5D4f9eyHEN9S7E7SQ6uFM7Wf8x
submitted by Xeagu to Monero [link] [comments]

market prepper

It's a rough start to the week for chipmakers as key semiconductor manufacturers cut off supplies to Huawei after the Trump administration added the Chinese company to a trade blacklist last week. Premarket movement: Qualcomm (NASDAQ:QCOM) -3.1%, Intel (NASDAQ:INTC) -1.8%; Xilinx (NASDAQ:XLNX) -2.7%, STMicroelectronics (NYSE:STM) -7.4%, Micron (NASDAQ:MU) -3.7%. Google started the trade suspensions over the weekend, leaving Huawei with access only to the open-source version of Android. Nokia (NYSE:NOK), which usually benefits from the Chinese firm's woes, is up 4.1% premarket, while Ericsson (NASDAQ:ERIC) shares are 1.6% higher.
Trade worries continue into new week
A move by the White House on Friday to remove steel import tariffs on Canada and Mexico added to optimism overnight, but U.S. stock index futures have now turned around, pointing to opening losses of 100 points for the DJIA. President Trump appears unwilling to offer a similar olive branch to Beijing, saying that any agreement had to be weighted in America's favor and couldn't be a "50-50" proposition, as the Huawei blacklist added to trade concerns. Risk-off sentiment was also seen due to the current tensions in the Gulf region, with a weekend tweet in which Trump threatened "the official end of Iran."
Powell speaks at Atlanta Fed conference
High on the agenda this evening is a keynote speech from Fed Chair Jerome Powell at the Atlanta Fed's annual Financial Markets Conference, entitled "Mapping the Financial Frontier: What does the next decade hold?" Investors are also likely to monitor a flurry of other speakers today including Philly Fed President Patrick Harker and Vice Chair Richard Clarida. Ahead of the events, the yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note was up 1 bps at around 2.4015, while the yield on the 30-year Treasury bond was also higher at around 2.8307.
OPEC+ seen keeping output cut plans
Crude futures climbed as high as 1.7% to $63.96/bbl overnight after Saudi Energy Minister Khalid al-Falih indicated there was consensus among OPEC and allied oil producers to drive down crude inventories "gently," although markets remain "fragile." "This second half, our preference is to maintain production management to keep inventories on their way declining gradually, softly but certainly declining towards normal levels," he told a news conference following a ministerial OPEC+ panel in Jeddah. Concerns about Iranian supply also gave prices a boost.
Australia markets applaud Morrison victory
Australia's benchmark S&P/ASX 200 rose to an 11-year high as Prime Minister Scott Morrison and the Liberal-led conservative government claimed a surprise victory at national elections. The index climbed 1.7% to 6,476, boosted by bank, coal miner, property and healthcare stocks. Those were among the sectors most affected by the campaign of the opposition Labor Party, which had pledged to take strong action on climate change and property tax loopholes.
A 'bold' offer for Brexit deal support
Theresa May has pledged to set out a "new and improved" Brexit deal next month as she attempts to put together a cross-party coalition of MPs to finally pass her Withdrawal Agreement Bill. The "bold offer" is expected to include new proposals to uphold EU standards of workers' rights and environmental protection to win over some Labour MPs despite the collapse of cross-party talks last week. May is also holding renewed talks with Northern Ireland’s Democratic Unionist party to see whether she can overcome their opposition.
Is USMCA closer to ratification?
Canada will move "full steam ahead" to ratify USMCA, Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland said on Saturday, a day after the U.S. agreed to lift tariffs on Canadian steel and aluminum. While several U.S. Democrats applauded removal of the tariffs, some said the new North American trade pact was not yet ready for their support. "House Democrats continue to have a number of substantial concerns related to labor, environment, enforcement, and access to affordable medicines provisions. Those issues still need to be remedied," said U.S. House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Richard Neal.
Latest 737 MAX blow for Boeing
Boeing (NYSE:BA) has acknowledged it had to correct flaws in its 737 MAX flight simulator software used to train pilots after recently discovering that they couldn't accurately replicate the difficult conditions created by a malfunctioning MCAS anti-stall system, which played a role in both the Ethiopian and Lion Air disasters. The company did not indicate when it first became aware of the problem, and whether it informed regulators, but its statement marked the first time Boeing admitted there was a software design flaw linked to the 737 MAX. BA -1% premarket.
More Turkish F-35 drama
The U.S. will "sooner or later" have to face reality and understand that Turkey's purchase of Russian S-400 systems is a done deal, President Tayyip Erdogan said, adding that Ankara would jointly produce the next generation S-500 system with Moscow. American officials have called Turkey's planned purchase "deeply problematic," saying it would risk its F-35 partnership because it would compromise the jets, made by Lockheed Martin (NYSE:LMT). "They (the U.S.) are passing the ball around in the midfield now, showing some reluctance," Erdogan declared. "But sooner or later, we will receive the F-35s. (The U.S.) not delivering them is not an option."
Next steps for T-Mobile-Sprint deal
Following talks with the FCC, T-Mobile (NASDAQ:TMUS) and Sprint (NYSE:S) are planning to announce commitments to the U.S. government within days that include asset sales and rural-service guarantees to help secure regulatory approval for their $26.5B merger, Bloomberg reports. Among them: The sale of one of their prepaid brands, a three-year buildout of their 5G network and a reiterated pledge not to raise prices while the network is being constructed. The deal has stoked concerns of reduced competition in the wireless industry because the number of major players would fall from four to three.
What else is happening...
Contributor Dale Roberts takes on the "dividend doubters or dividend deniers."
Major oil deal between Iraq and Exxon Mobil (NYSE:XOM) slows after staff evacuation.
Furious weekend rally takes Bitcoin (BTC-USD) back above $8K.
Markets in India soar on projected Modi win.
Deutsche Bank (NYSE:DB) slips despite denial of NYT report on Trump transactions.
New investment from Capital Re sees Juul (JUUL) valuation top $38B?
Dish Network (NASDAQ:DISH) to acquire EchoStar's (NASDAQ:SATS) BSS Business for $800M.
"What Determines The Investment News Agenda?" asks contributor Jeff Miller.
Today's Markets In Asia, Japan +0.2%. Hong Kong -0.6%. China -0.4%. India +3.8%. In Europe, at midday, London -0.8%. Paris -1.3%. Frankfurt -1.3%. Futures at 6:20, Dow -0.4%. S&P -0.4%. Nasdaq -1%. Crude +0.3% to $63.10. Gold -0.1% to $1275. Bitcoin -1.1% to $8017. Ten-year Treasury Yield +1 bps to 2.4%
Today's Economic Calendar 8:30 Chicago Fed National Activity Index 8:50 Fed's Bostic Speech 9:30 Fed's Harker: Economic Outlook 1:00 PM Fed's Williams Speech 1:00 PM Fed's Clarida Speech 7:00 PM Jerome Powell Speech
submitted by upbstock to Optionmillionaires [link] [comments]

Lisk Highlights weekly roundup February 17th 2019.

Hello everybody. The LISK project and it's enthusiasts are always busy, and this week past has certainly been no exception.
Seeing is believing, so here is a recap of the highlights and interesting items from the past week on the LISK subreddit and beyond.....
 

LiskUSA Goes Deep in it's Response to LIP11

"The proposed LIP11 will have the opposite effect of what it is intending to solve"; this was the collective opinion of the LiskUSA group in reaction to the Lisk Improvement Proposal dealing with the "change to one vote per account in our DPoS". LiskUSA continued, "It will likely cause a decrease in decentralization, replace coalitions with whales (or coalitions of whales), and competition will decrease as standby delegates are disenfranchised even further".
The piece published on the official LiskUSA website and also submitted to the LIP mailing list HERE was written and compiled by Matthew C AKA Ultrafresh and Edward Trosclair AKA StellarDynamic, elected Lisk Delegate. Lisk USA is a community run organization that was made to coordinate, recognize, and reward outreach and developments for Lisk.
Aside from disagreeing with the proposal as it stands, an interesting additional proposal was put forward by LiskUSA, or maybe proposal is too strong a word; maybe an idea is a better way to put it. This was where they wrote... "An interesting but perhaps controversial idea; It is very common for video games to completely wipe a beta server at the official launch of the game. While it goes against the idea of immutability, a one time re-vote / election could be seen as a way to make the landscape more fair for new delegates who will never have a chance of getting votes from some of the large lost accounts”.
There are loads more interesting insights contained within the 2400+ word submission. You can check it all out for yourself HERE.
 

Lisk is Ranking High on Google for Blockchain Terms.

Lisk community member zOwn3Ds over on Lisk Chat seems to have been doing a bit of googling over the weekend when he stumbled across something that impressed him, which led him to post, "good to see lisk academy popping up first in google". He searched for the terms "blockchain node" and the result delivered showed Lisk sitting in No. 1 place for that search.
I decided to do a bit of googling of other terms related to Lisk so firstly I searched for "blockchain dpos" and again the result displayed showed Lisk in No. 1 place for that search. I found the same with simply searching "dpos". Another one of note that again showed Lisk sitting high in No. 2 place for the term "blockchain consensus". It seems The Lisk team's SEO is starting to pay good dividends. Long may it continue.
 

Lisk Sidechain Project Beefs Up its Digital Marketing.

The MADANA project have teamed up with UFOstart, a Berlin based marketing company specialising in blockchain tokensales and business startups. This will result in Lars Schulze, UFOstart Co-Founder, spending quite a bit of time with the MADANA team as he applies his 22 years of experience in the Online Marketing field to their projects promotional moves. Didi Lace, MADANA COO & Co-Founder, welcomed Lars via twitter by saying "A great partner for the interesting road ahead! Glad to have you on board".
The MADANA project has closed its pre-sale and is now preparing for its main sale, so personally I believe it is a good move for the team to bring onboard someone with the amount of experience of Lars, not to mention the contacts his company, UFOstart, can access. Lars founded his first internet company in 1996 and he has reportedly supported more than 100 projects - from startups and SMEs to large corporations. As a part of UFOstart he has worked with such blockchain projects as ascribe, metamorph, photochain, polygravity, rehaptix, womtoken, and Ocean Protocol.
You can view a picture of the MADANA team complete with Lars (third from right) HERE
 

LISK Sidechain Project's Co-Founder Lays Out the Development Plan for the Week Ahead .

Yesterday, Chief R&D Officer and Co-founder of GNY, Richard Jarritt (bringing Machine Learning to Lisk) revealed the tasks for the week to the projects followers on the GNY telegram.
1. Analysis.
The team will undertake a comprehensive analysis of the solutions other Machine Learning developers have offered within the DPOS space. This to ensure their efforts are above current industry standards. Dissection, comparison, and learning for the team this week so.
2. Internal Education.
The heads of team are creating guides to the projects Machine Learning in Python and Javascript. This is to ensure all team members not only understand the concept but also the code. Internal education cannot be underestimated and is vital to keep all team members aligned.
3. Timeline.
Drafting a completion timeline for the GNY Machine Learning operating within the codebase that Leo Liang (known from the Asch decentralized application platform) has created. This will be made available to the public.
The GNY universal Beta Api plug-in update is out now and testing is welcomed for commercial developers aiming to work with Machine learning and blockchain. You can visit Github to view the steps to run it HERE.
 

Lisk, Spreading from Costa Rica in Central America to Atlanta in North America.

Lisk Central America have released a comprehensive recap of their presentation at TicoBlockChain 2019 in Costa Rica. Software Architect, Jake Simmons, represented LISK Central America with his presentation on 'Scaling blockchain horizontally with Lisk'. Jake's presentation took part in the midst of the conference's speaker collection of lawyers, developers, educators, banking executives, investment professionals, their keynotes, panel talks and fireside chats.
Lisk Central America is an organization with the intention of bringing awareness of the LISK blockchain application platform and Blockchain in general to Central America. So we are talking, Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Panama. Now generally the group's main focus is local meetups, but on this particular occasion the collective took a step into the conference circuit, and from reading their upbeat recap of TicoBlockChain, I don't think it will be the last.
For those of us who could not make the trip we have Lisk community member illuciferium to thank for filming Jake's presentation and uploading it to Youtube HERE. You can also see Jake being interviewed at the conference by Ricardo Barquero, Nimiq Community Manager in this VIDEO
Well done Jake, and we hope to see you introducing Lisk to many more folk in the months to come.
 
Now from a past event in South America to one that is upcoming in North America, and with that we look at towards Atlanta. Lisk delegate Blockvibe's aim is to foster, support, and expand the Lisk ecosystem in South Korea and the United States of America. One of their major plans for the community is to organize and host regular meetups and Lisk sidechain conferences in these regions. To that end they will be hosting an Atlanta Blockchain Meetup on Sat Feb 16 (1 to 3pm), titled "Intro to Blockchain and the Lisk Platform". Further details of the event can be found HERE. Bob Anglin from those lively Lisk Delegates bloqspace.io will be the guest speaker on day. Free food and prize draws are also promised.
Good luck and best wishes to all the event organisers and those folk who where-possible come out to attend these meetups.
 
That's it for the recap of the weeks highlights. I hope it brought you up to speed with all the weeks good news.
These highlight posts also go out daily on the….
LISK Highlights exclusive Telegram group
LISK Highlights Twitter
The highlights are also included in my weekly roundup on the LISK Highlights Medium account and the Bitcoin talk forum's LISK thread, so keep an eye out for them on these outlets also.
 
Keep the faith Liskers! 👍
submitted by John_Muck to Lisk [link] [comments]

NFL Playoff Pick'Em Reddit Challenge [Conference Championships]

Alright folks, The Divisional Round is in the books!
Congratulations to the 27 of you who picked perfectly this past weekend and an even bigger congratulations to our 16 contestants who remain perfect!!
Check your rankings Here and let me know of any discrepancies.
I apologize to anyone who entered during the Divisional Round who missed the Wild Card Weekend cutoff. I may not have stated it clear enough last week that the entry cutoff was the wild card weekend. Therefore, those picks were not tallied. Anyway, it is statistically impossible for you to win this contest because of these 16 aces we have.
Huge drop-off between the weeks. We lost about 150 redditors who did not submit their Divisional Round Picks...
For those of you remaining in the spreadsheet, let's get those picks in by Sunday's 3:05P ET Kickoff!
For bragging rights and...
the graciously donated top prize of a 0.06 Bitcoin Free Bet on Nitrogensports.eu by our mod and saviour stander414 approx. value - 50$
Conference Championships
Sunday, January 22
3:05 P ET Green Bay Packers @ Atlanta Falcons
6:40P ET Pittsburgh Steelers @ New England Patriots
submitted by ReeferBandit3rd to sportsbook [link] [comments]

Lisk Highlights, February 14th 2019: Lisk, Spreading from Costa Rica in Central America to Atlanta in North America.

Lisk Central America have released a comprehensive recap of their presentation at TicoBlockChain 2019 in Costa Rica. Software Architect, Jake Simmons, represented LISK Central America with his presentation on 'Scaling blockchain horizontally with Lisk'. Jake's presentation took part in the midst of the conference's speaker collection of lawyers, developers, educators, banking executives, investment professionals, their keynotes, panel talks and fireside chats.
Lisk Central America is an organization with the intention of bringing awareness of the LISK blockchain application platform and Blockchain in general to Central America. So we are talking, Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Panama. Now generally the group's main focus is local meetups, but on this particular occasion the collective took a step into the conference circuit, and from reading their upbeat recap of TicoBlockChain, I don't think it will be the last.
For those of us who could not make the trip we have Lisk community member illuciferium to thank for filming Jake's presentation and uploading it to Youtube HERE. You can also see Jake being interviewed at the conference by Ricardo Barquero, Nimiq Community Manager in this VIDEO
Well done Jake, and we hope to see you introducing Lisk to many more folk in the months to come.
 
Now from a past event in South America to one that is upcoming in North america, and with that we look at towards Atlanta. Lisk delegate Blockvibe's aim is to foster, support, and expand the Lisk ecosystem in South Korea and the United States of America. One of their major plans for the community is to organize and host regular meetups and Lisk sidechain conferences in these regions. To that end they will be hosting an Atlanta Blockchain Meetup on Sat Feb 16 (1 to 3pm), titled "Intro to Blockchain and the Lisk Platform". Further details of the event can be found HERE. Bob Anglin from those lively Lisk Delegates bloqspace.io will be the guest speaker on day. Free food and prize draws are also promised.
Good luck and best wishes to all the event organisers and those folk who where-possible come out to attend these meetups.
 
That's it for today's highlights.
These highlight posts also go out daily on the….
LISK Highlights exclusive Telegram group: https://t.me/LiskHighlights
LISK Highlights Twitter : https://twitter.com/HighlightsLisk
LISK Highlights Medium: https://medium.com/@LiskHighlights
The highlights are also included in my weekly roundup on the LISK Highlights Medium account and the Bitcoin talk forum's LISK thread, so keep an eye out for them on these outlets also.
 
Keep the faith Liskers! 👍
submitted by John_Muck to Lisk [link] [comments]

TabConf Monero Report

TabConf Monero Report
"I appeal to you, brothers and sisters, in the name of our Lord Satoshi Nakamoto, that all of you agree with one another in what you say and that there be no divisions among you, but that you be perfectly united in mind and thought." - 1 Corinthians 1:10
Fellow Disciples of Privacy,
I have returned to tell the tale my pilgrimage to Atlanta, GA where I spread the gospel of our devout belief in financial privacy. I was there from Feb 7-11 and the conference itself was Feb 8-10. Here is the link to the event website.
Feb 8
On my way to the 1st day of the event I talked to a woman with a booth outside holding a "Free Stress Test" sign. She was representing Scientology and informed me of the practice of Dianetics. She explained that Dianetics is the process of identifying negative memories in the brain and removing them so they cannot be stimulated to be re-experienced. She denied that such process could be performed by stimulating the amygdala with an electrode.
I went on my way to the workshop event at TabConf where I learned about IBM's Hyperledger Fabric and stepped into Bitpay's workshop where they were working with the "Bitcoin-Core" client. Later I met up with midipoet and learned from a passing group that the host of this conference, Georgia State University, had a large computer network that performed substantial rendering for their video production in the Entrepreneurship Department. I went to meet with the director of that department, Elizabeth Strickler and asked if they had ever considered subsidizing the cost of that hardware by mining Monero with it. She was curious about this idea but ultimately the University pays for the electricity and that was beyond the scope of her authority. She told me she would connect me with higher up directors.
After lunch I sat in the Hashgraph (Hedera) meetup.
The pre-conference party at the Beer Garden Bar happened a few hours later where I met 2 members of the Church of Monero and several other OG crypto community members. I talked with rehrar, his better looking half, and midipoet discussing the state of the Monero community. I didn't go to sleep until ~2 am, grabbing food at a late night Atlanta diner with a few other people.
Feb 9
In the morning I caught rehrar's talk.
Later I went and talked with Paul Puey paullinator from Edge about his experience implementing Monero into their platform. He explained to me that it has been very challenging for them to implement and maintain Monero functionality. The frequent network upgrades and unique code structure "almost require a full time Monero engineer." [Maybe this could be a decentralized position the Monero community could crowdfund?] I expressed my concern and understanding of the challenges Edge has faced regarding Monero and assured him that I would bring this concern to the rest of the community.
As I walked around the booths at TabConf, I also met with Brian Hoffman of Open Bazaar where I asked about Monero integration, possible i2p data transmission layer, and Discord-like chat functionality in their new Haven app. He expressed similar challenges for Monero integration and I proposed that he contact binaryfate to integrate one way XMR -> BTC functionality with xmr.to's API to get around the need to maintain a Monero wallet while maintaining some financial privacy.
I learned about the struggle of being a woman in Blockchain at the "Women in Blockchain Panel".
I was there for (Chris Derose's) brighton36's shocking reveal in his presentation on Professionalism in Blockchain.
Daniel Krawisz danielkrawisz then taught us about using Mass Hypnosis through costly signalling to communicate Bitcoin to the world.
Mike In Space showed us several controversial Bitcoin Car Talk videos.
Diego rehrar eating apple sauce!
Eventually we all met up at Skyline Park for dinner, drinks and a rooftop party.
Me at the rooftop bar with a view of Atlanta
We were all out late partying. TabConf had an open tab all night and your TabConf ticket got you in free.
@ComEatMeBra (Telegram) from the Church of Monero found this Hymnal with an M inscribed on it while walking through the street.
@joshuam_ (Twitter) from Decred was out late with us partying.
Feb 10
On this Sunday, the Church of Monero held is largest "in real life" Mass with five people from TabConf total participating.
Chris Derose, Daniel Krawisz, and Xeagu
We introduced two new members to the Church of Monero and had four people plus me participate in Mass.
I went to listen to the Lightning Network Panel and have been interested in this technology since I heard about the Lightning Network Torch Ceremony on Twitter where people send a "Torch" to each other using Lightning Network transactions. This ritual is similar to the Church of Monero Mass.
Afterwards I stayed for the CEO/Founder Panel with Paul Puey, Brian Hoffman, Stephen Pair, and Wayne Vaughan (from left to right).
I think the CEO Panel was my favorite segment of the conference. The conference really put together a diverse speaker set and appropriately organized the CEO Panel in a way that was conducive to understand many different perspectives within the ecosystem. Estimates for victory in this crypto revolution range from 4 to 20 years. Private Key Custody will be an important variable in this process.
After the panel, I listened to Kevin Pham, Chris Derose, rm0rf, and several others further discuss the sovereignty of crypto nation states and between them the competition to develop the best blockchain tech.

If you like this work, please donate Monero: 43zN7eLtPB5iBgnZKv9p6BhtE56cmCwkjM1kJAtznFoEfpNjpdAGU3TLwBkhsw7gLmHSR5D4f9eyHEN9S7E7SQ6uFM7Wf8x
submitted by Xeagu to ChurchOfMonero [link] [comments]

Agustín Carstens, General Manager of the Bank for International Settlements (BIS, the central bank of central banks) on Cryptocurrencies today

I'd like to hear your thoughts on his lecture held today at the Goethe University in Frankfurt, Germany.
Read the full transcript here or via pdf link. https://www.bis.org/speeches/sp180206.pdf
1/10 Money in the digital age: what role for central banks? Lecture by Agustín Carstens General Manager, Bank for International Settlements House of Finance, Goethe University Frankfurt, 6 February 2018
Introduction Good morning, ladies and gentlemen. Thank you for that kind introduction, Jens. I am very happy to be here at this prestigious university and to be part of this impressive lecture series sponsored by Sustainable Architecture for Finance in Europe (SAFE), the Center for Financial Studies (CFS) and the Deutsche Bundesbank. I would also like to thank Professor Brigitte Haar for being such a generous host today. It is an honour to discuss money at an event organised by the Bundesbank, which has been a beacon of stability since its foundation some 60 years ago. As Jens can attest, being a central banker is a fascinating job. In fact, it is a privilege. During the last decade it has been anything but quiet in the central banking world. We have been confronted with extraordinary circumstances that have required extraordinary policy responses. In such an environment, it has been of the utmost importance to share experiences and lessons learnt among central banks, creating a body of knowledge that will be there for the future. One of the reasons that central bank Governors from all over the world gather in Basel every two months is precisely to discuss issues at the front and centre of the policy debate. Following the Great Financial Crisis, many hours have been spent discussing the design and implications of, for example, unconventional monetary policies such as quantitative easing and negative interest rates. Lately, we have seen a bit of a shift, to issues at the very heart of central banking. This shift is driven by developments at the cutting edge of technology. While it has been bubbling under the surface for years, the meteoric rise of bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies has led us to revisit some fundamental questions that touch on the origin and raison d’être for central banks: • What is money? • What constitutes good money, and where do cryptocurrencies fit in? • And, finally, what role should central banks play? The thrust of my lecture will be that, at the end of the day, money is an indispensable social convention backed by an accountable institution within the State that enjoys public trust. Many things have served as money, but experience suggests that something widely accepted, reliably provided and stable in its command over goods and services works best. Experience has also shown that to be credible, money requires institutional backup, which is best provided by a central bank. While central banks’ actions and services will evolve with technological developments, the rise of cryptocurrencies only highlights the important role central banks have played, and continue to play, as stewards of public trust. Private digital tokens posing as currencies, such as bitcoin and other crypto-assets that have mushroomed of late, must not endanger this trust in the fundamental value and nature of money.
What is money? “What is money?” is obviously a key question for any central banker, and one on which economists have spent much ink. The answer depends on how deep and philosophical one wants to be. Being at a university, especially one named after Goethe, I think I can err on the side of being philosophical. Conventional wisdom tells you that “money is what money does”.1 That is, money is a unit of account, a means of payment and a store of value. But telling you what something does does not really tell you what it is. And it certainly does not tell you why we need or have money, how it comes about and what the preconditions are for it to exist. In terms of the “need” for money, you may learn that money is a way to get around the general lack of double coincidence of wants. That is, it is rare that I have what you want and you have what I want at the same time. As barter is definitely not an efficient way of organising an economy, money is demanded as a tool to facilitate exchange. What about the other side of the coin, so to speak? How does money come about? Again, conventional wisdom may tell you that central banks provide money, ie cash (coins and notes), and commercial banks supply deposits. But this answer is often not fully satisfactory, as it does not tell why and how banks should be the one to “create” money. If you venture into more substantive analyses on monetary economics, things get more complex. One theory, which proposes that “money is memory”, amounts to arguing that a “superledger” can facilitate exchange just like money. This argument says a ledger is a way of keeping track of not only who has what but also who owes, and is owed, what. I will come back to this later. Moving beyond this line of thought, other scholarly and historical analyses provide answers that are more philosophical. These often amount to “money is a convention” – one party accepts it as payment in the expectation that others will also do so.2 Money is an IOU, but a special one because everyone in the economy trusts that it will be accepted by others in exchange for goods and services. One might say money is a “we all owe you”. Many things have served as money in this way. Figure 1 gives some examples: Yap stones, gold coins, cigarettes in war times, $100,000 bills, wissel (Wechsel), ie bills of exchange or bearer notes, such as those issued by the Bank of Amsterdam in the first half of the 17th century. It includes an example from my own country, Aztec hoe (or axe) money, a form of (unstamped) money made of copper used in central Mexico and parts of Central America. 1 See J Hicks, Critical essays in monetary theory, 1979. 2 See D Lewis, Convention: a philosophical study, 1969.
Common to most of these examples is that the nominal value of the items that have served at one time as money is unrelated to their intrinsic value. Indeed, as we know very well in the case of fiat money, the intrinsic value of most of its representations is zero. History shows that money as a convention needs to have a basis of trust, supported by some form of institutional arrangement.3 As Curzio Giannini puts it: “The evolution of monetary institutions appears to be above all the fruit of a continuous dialogue between economic and political spheres, with each taking turns to create monetary innovations … and to safeguard the common interest against abuse stemming from partisan interests.”4 Money can come in different institutional forms and colours. How to organise them? The paper by Bech and Garratt in last September’s BIS Quarterly Review presented the money flower as a way of organising monies in today’s environment.5 It acknowledges that money can take on rather different forms and be supplied in various ways. The money flower Allow me to explain, noting that we do not sell seeds to this money flower! 3 Fiat means “by law“. So, in principle, it should be said that money exists by convention or by law. But if trust in money does not prevail, the legal mandate that conveys value to money becomes meaningless. 4 C Giannini, The age of central banks, 2011. 5 M Bech and R Garratt, “Central bank cryptocurrencies”, BIS Quarterly Review, September 2017, pp 55–70.
The money flower highlights four key properties on the supply side of money: the issuer, the form, the degree of accessibility and the transfer mechanism. • The issuer can be either the central bank or “other”. “Other” includes nobody, that is, a particular type of money that is not the liability of anyone. • In terms of the form it takes, money is either electronic or physical. • Accessibility refers to how widely the type of money is available. It can either be wide or limited. • Transfer mechanism can either be a central intermediary or peer-to-peer, meaning transactions occur directly between the payer and the payee without the need for a central intermediary. Let us look at where some common types of money fit into the flower, starting with cash (or bank notes) as we know it today. Cash is issued by the central bank, is not electronic, is available to everyone and is peer-to-peer. I do not need a trusted third party such as Jens to help me pay each of you 10 euros. Let us try another one: bank deposits. They are not the liability of the central bank, mostly electronic, and in most countries available to most people, but clearly not peer-to-peer. Transferring resources from a bank deposit requires the involvement of at least your own bank, perhaps the central bank and the recipient’s bank. Think here not only of commercial bank deposits but also bills, eg non-interest bearing (bearer) certificates, issued privately, as in the case of the Bank of Amsterdam mentioned earlier. Local or regional currencies are the ones that can be spent in a particular geographical location at participating organisations. They tend to be physical. The túmin, for example, was a local currency circulating (illegally) for some time around 2010 exclusively in the Mexican municipality of Espinal. What does digitalisation mean for the flower? Digitalisation is nothing new: financial services and most forms of money have been largely digital for many years. Much of the ongoing transformation is just adding a mobile version for many services, which means that the device becomes a virtual extension of the institution. As such, there is not a new model. The money flower then also easily accommodates these forms.
That is also the case for the digital, account-based forms of money that central banks traditionally have made available to commercial banks and, in some instances, to certain other financial or public institutions (ie bank reserves). It would also be the case if the central bank were to issue digital money to the wider public for general purposes. Each central bank will have to make its own decision on whether issuing digital money is desirable, after considering factors such as the structure of the financial system and underlying preferences for privacy. The central bank community is actively analysing this issue. A potentially important and leapfrogging digital-related development, however, is distributed ledger technology (DLT), the basis for Bitcoin. Many think DLT could transform financial service provision, maybe first wholesale, then possibly retail. For example, it could enhance settlement efficiency involving securities and derivatives transactions. A few central banks have conducted experiments in this area, for example the Bank of Canada, the Bundesbank, the Monetary Authority of Singapore and the Bank of England.6 Yet doubts remain regarding the maturity of DLT and the size of associated efficiency gains relative to existing technologies. Moreover, their robustness, including to cyber-risk, is still to be fully understood and ascertained. Still, there are potential benefits, and I expect that central banks will remain engaged on this topic.7 For now, DLT is largely used to “create” bitcoin and other digital currencies. Such cryptocurrencies can be placed easily in the money flower. Nobody issues them, they are not physical and they are peer-to-peer. But beyond that, how should one think about them? What constitutes good money? Just because we are able to find a place for bitcoin in our money flower does not mean we should consider it as “good” money. As I mentioned before, trust is the fundamental tenet that underpins credible currencies, and this trust has to be earned and supported. There are many lessons from history and institutional economics on the earning of trust that we can use as we move further into digitalisation.8 Over the ages, many forms of private money have come and gone. It is fair to say that the same has happened with various experiments with public money (that is, money issued by a public entity that is not the central bank). While some lasted longer than others, most have invariably given way to some form of central bank money. The main reason for their disappearance is that the “incentives to cheat” are simply too high. Let me give three historical examples: one in Germany, another in the United States and the last one in Mexico. In Germany, the Thirty Years War (1618–48), involving small German states of the Holy Roman Empire and neighbouring regional powers, was associated with one of the most severe economic crises ever recorded, with rampant hyperinflation – just as happened three centuries later during the Weimar Republic – and the breakdown of trade and economic activity. The crisis became known as the Kipper- und Wipperzeit (the clipping and culling times), after the practice of clipping coins (shaving metal from their circumference) and sorting good coins from bad. This morning, we are launching a BIS Working Paper, by Professor Isabel Schnabel and BIS Economic Adviser Hyun Song Shin, which further details and explains this experience, as background to my speech. 6 See Bech and Garratt, op cit. 7 See Committee on Payments and Market Infrastructures, Distributed ledger technology in payment, clearing and settlement: an analytical framework, February 2017. 8 See D North, Institutions, institutional change and economic performance, 1990.
While episodes of currency debasement have occurred throughout history, this one stands out for two reasons. First is the severity of the crisis and its rapid regional spread. Debasement proceeded at such a pace that public authorities quickly lost control of the downward spiral. Second is how the debasement was brought under control. This occurred through standardisation of wholesale payments by public deposit banks, for example the Bank of Hamburg and the Bank of Amsterdam. These were in many ways examples of the precursors of modern central banks. As the working paper argues, monetary order could be brought to an otherwise chaotic situation by providing reliable payment means through precursors to central bank money, which at the end means the use of a credible institutional arrangement. In the period in the United States known as the Free Banking Era, from 1837 to 1863, many banks sprang up that issued currency with no oversight of any kind by the federal government.10 These so-called free bank notes did not work very well as a medium of exchange. Given that there were so many banks of varying reputations issuing notes, they sold at different prices in different places, making transactions quite complicated. And as supervision was largely absent, banks had limited restraint in issuing notes and did not back them up sufficiently with specie (gold or silver), thereby debasing their values. This era of “wildcat banking” ended up being a long and costly period of banking instability in the history of the US, with banking panics and major disruptions to economic activity. It was, after some further hiccups, followed by the establishment of the Federal Reserve System in 1913. Let me present a final example, from Mexican monetary history. A little known fact is that Mexico had the first series of hyperinflations at the beginning of the 20th century. My country had a revolution from 1910 to 1921, in which no central government existed in an effective way, with many factions fighting and disputing different territories. A winning faction would arrive in a territory, print its own money and make void previously issued cash. So different bills issued by different factions coexisted, leading to chaos and hyperinflation. To give you an idea of the disorder, in 2015 four trunks full of bills were returned to Mexico after having been appropriated by the US Navy in 1914, when the US occupied the port city of Veracruz. In the trunks, the Bank of Mexico discovered dozens of types of bills that the central bank had not even known existed.11 At the end of the conflict, a new constitution was drafted, having as a central article one which gave the Bank of Mexico the appropriate institutional framework, designating it the exclusive issuer of currency in the country. Once this was in place, hyperinflation ceased, illustrating the importance of controlling fiscal dominance (which tends to be the result of the abuse of publicly issued money). Based on these experiences, most observers, and I suspect all of you here, would agree that laissez-faire is not a good approach in banking or in the issuance of money. Indeed, the paradigm of strict bank regulation and supervision and central banks overseeing the financial and monetary system that has emerged over the last century or so has proven to be the most effective way to avoid the instability and high economic costs associated with the proliferation of private and public monies. 9 I Schnabel and H S Shin, “Money and trust: lessons from the 1620s for money in the digital age”, BIS Working Papers, no 698, February 2018. 10 See G Dwyer, “Wildcat banking, banking panics, and free banking in the United States”, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta Economic Review, vol 81, nos 3–6, 1996; A Rolnick and W Weber, “New evidence of the free banking era”, The American Economic Review, vol 73, no 5, December 1983, pp 1080–91; and C Calomiris, “Banking crises yesterday and today”, Financial History Review, vol 17, no 1, 2010, pp 3–12. 11 See Bank of Mexico, “La SRE entregó al Banco de México un acervo de billetes de la época del porfiriato”, press release, 1 June 2015, www.banxico.org.mx/informacion-para-la-prensa/comunicados/billetes-y-monedas/billetes/%7B3A41E6F8-FBD8-2FA7-DA0B-66FCCE46430A%7D.pdf.
The unhappy experience with private forms of money raises deep questions about whether the proliferation of cryptocurrencies is desirable or sustainable. Even if the supply of one type of cryptocurrency is limited, the mushrooming of so many of them means that the total supply of all forms of cryptocurrency is unlimited. Added to this is the practice of “forking”, where an offshoot of an existing cryptocurrency can be conjured up from thin air. Given the experience with currency debasement that has peppered history, the proliferation of such private monies should give everyone pause for thought. I will return to this shortly. We have learned over the centuries that money as a social institution requires a solution to the problem of a lack of trust.12 The central banks that often emerged in the wake of the private and public money collapses may not have looked like the ones we have today, but they all had some institutional backing. The forms of this backing for their issuance of money have differed over time and by country.13 Commodity money has often been the start. History shows that gold and other precious metals stored in the vault with governance (and physical) safeguards can provide some assurance. Commodity money is not the only or necessarily sufficient mechanism. Often it also required a city-, state- or nation-provided charter, as with the emergence of giro banks in many European countries. Later, the willingness of central banks to convert money for gold at a fixed price (the gold standard) was the mechanism. Currency boards, where local money is issued one-to-one with changes in foreign currency holdings, can also work to provide credibility. The tried, trusted and resilient modern way to provide confidence in public money is the independent central bank. This means legal safeguards and agreed goals, ie clear monetary policy objectives, operational, instrument and administrative independence, together with democratic accountability to ensure broad-based political support and legitimacy. While not fully immune from the temptation to cheat, central banks as an institution are hard to beat in terms of safeguarding society’s economic and political interest in a stable currency. Where do cryptocurrencies fit in? One could argue that bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies’ attractiveness lies in an intelligent application of DLT. DLT provides a method to broadcast transactions publicly and pseudonymously in a way that achieves in principle ledger immutability.14 Who would have thought that having people guessing solutions to what was described to me by a techie as the mathematical equivalent of mega-sudokus would be a way to generate consensus among strangers around the world through a proof of work? Does it thus provide a novel solution to the problem of how to generate trust among people who do not know each other? If DLT provides the potential for a superledger, could bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies then substitute for some forms of money?15 We do not have the full answers, but at this time the answer, also in the light of historical experiences, is probably a sound no, for many reasons. In fact, we are seeing the type of cracks and cheating that brought down other private currencies starting to appear in the House of Bitcoin. As an institution, Bitcoin has some obvious flaws. 12 See M King, “The institutions of monetary policy”, speech at the American Economic Association Annual Meeting, San Diego, 4 January 2004. 13 See Giannini, op cit. 14 See Committee on Payments and Market Infrastructures, op cit. 15 See N Kocherlakota, “Money is memory”, Journal of Economic Theory, vol 81, pp 232–51, 1998. In fact, he shows in a very stark setting that having a costless means to record the memory of all economic actors, both present and past, can do as much as money, and sometimes more. Conversely, money effectively functions as memory by providing an observable record of past transactions – that is, agents can tell whether a potential trader is running a current deficit or surplus with society by looking at the money balances that trader is carrying. The finding, however, is theoretical and not robust to slight changes in assumptions, including the risk of loss of data.
Debasement. As I mentioned, we may be seeing the modern-day equivalent of clipping and culling. In Bitcoin, these take the form of forks, a type of spin-off in which developers clone Bitcoin’s software, release it with a new name and a new coin, after possibly adding a few new features or tinkering with the algorithms’ parameters. Often, the objective is to capitalise on the public’s familiarity with Bitcoin to make some serious money, at least virtually. Last year alone, 19 Bitcoin forks came out, including Bitcoin Cash, Bitcoin Gold and Bitcoin Diamond. Forks can fork again, and many more could happen. After all, it just takes a bunch of smart programmers and a catchy name. As in the past, these modern-day clippings dilute the value of existing ones, to the extent such cryptocurrencies have any economic value at all. Trust. As the saying goes, trust takes years to build, seconds to break and forever to repair. Historical experiences suggest that these “assets” are probably not sustainable as money. Cryptocurrencies are not the liability of any individual or institution, or backed by any authority. Governance weaknesses, such as the concentration of their ownership, could make them even less trustworthy. Indeed, to use them often means resorting to an intermediary (for example, the bitcoin exchanges) to which one has to trust one’s money. More generally, they piggyback on the same institutional infrastructure that serves the overall financial system and on the trust that it provides. This reflects their challenge to establish their own trust in the face of cyber-attacks, loss of customers’ funds, limits on transferring funds and inadequate market integrity. Inefficiency. Novel technology is not the same as better technology or better economics. That is clearly the case with Bitcoin: while perhaps intended as an alternative payment system with no government involvement, it has become a combination of a bubble, a Ponzi scheme and an environmental disaster. The volatility of bitcoin renders it a poor means of payment and a crazy way to store value. Very few people use it for payments or as a unit of account. In fact, at a major cryptocurrency conference the registration fee could not be paid with bitcoins because it was too costly and slow: only conventional money was accepted. To the extent they are used, bitcoins and their cousins seem more attractive to those who want to make transactions in the black or illegal economy, rather than everyday transactions. In a way, this should not be surprising, since individuals who massively evade taxes or launder money are the ones who are willing to live with cryptocurrencies’ extreme price volatility. In practice, central bank experiments show that DLT-based systems are very expensive to run and slower and much less efficient to operate than conventional payment and settlement systems. The electricity used in the process of mining bitcoins is staggering, estimated to be equal to the amount Singapore uses every day in electricity,16 making them socially wasteful and environmentally bad. Therefore, the current fascination with these cryptocurrencies seems to have more to do with a speculative mania than any use as a form of electronic payment, except for illegal activities. Accordingly, authorities are edging closer and closer to clamping down to contain the risks related to cryptocurrencies. There is a strong case for policy intervention. As now noted by many securities markets and regulatory and supervisory agencies, these assets can raise concerns related to consumer and investor protection. Appropriate authorities have a duty to educate and protect investors and consumers, and need to be prepared to act. Moreover, there are concerns related to tax evasion, money laundering and criminal finance. Authorities should welcome innovation. But they have a duty to make sure technological advances are not used to legitimise profits from illegal activities. 16 See Digiconomist, “Bitcoin energy consumption index”, digiconomist.net/bitcoin-energy-consumption.
What role for the central bank? Central banks, acting by themselves and/or in coordination with other financial authorities like bank regulators and supervisors, ministries of finance, tax agencies and financial intelligence units, may also need to act, given their roles in providing money services and safeguarding money’s real value. Working with commercial banks, authorities have a part to play in policing the digital frontier. Commercial banks are on the front line since they are the ones settling trades, providing real liquidity, keeping exchanges going and interacting with customers. It is alarming that some banks have advertised “bitcoin ATMs” where you can buy and sell bitcoins. Authorities need to ensure commercial banks do not facilitate unscrupulous behaviours. Central banks need to safeguard payment systems. To date, Bitcoin is not functional as a means of payment, but it relies on the oxygen provided by the connection to standard means of payments and trading apps that link users to conventional bank accounts. If the only “business case” is use for illicit or illegal transactions, central banks cannot allow such tokens to rely on much of the same institutional infrastructure that serves the overall financial system and freeload on the trust that it provides. Authorities should apply the principle that the Basel Process has adhered to for years: to provide a level playing field to all participants in financial markets (banks and non-banks alike), while at the same time fostering innovative, secure and competitive markets. In this context, this means, among other things, ensuring that the same high standards that money transfer and payment service providers have to meet are also met by Bitcoin-type exchanges. It also means ensuring that legitimate banking and payment services are only offered to those exchanges and products that meet these high standards. Financial authorities may also have a case to intervene to ensure financial stability. To date, many judge that, given cryptocurrencies’ small size and limited interconnectedness, concerns about them do not rise to a systemic level. But if authorities do not act pre-emptively, cryptocurrencies could become more interconnected with the main financial system and become a threat to financial stability. Most importantly, the meteoric rise of cryptocurrencies should not make us forget the important role central banks play as stewards of public trust. Private digital tokens masquerading as currencies must not subvert this trust. As history has shown, there simply is no substitute. Still, central banks are embracing new technologies as appropriate. Many new developments can help. For example, fintech and “techfin” – which refers to established technology platforms venturing into financial services. These are changing financial service provision in many countries, most clearly in payments, and especially in some emerging market economies (for example, China and Kenya). While they introduce the possibility of non-bank financial institutions introducing money-type instruments, which raises a familiar set of regulatory questions, they do present scope for many gains. Conclusion In conclusion, while cryptocurrencies may pretend to be currencies, they fail the basic textbook definitions. Most would agree that they do not function as a unit of account. Their volatile valuations make them unsafe to rely on as a common means of payment and a stable store of value. They also defy lessons from theory and experiences. Most importantly, given their many fragilities, cryptocurrencies are unlikely to satisfy the requirement of trust to make them sustainable forms of money. While new technologies have the potential to improve our lives, this is not invariably the case. Thus, central banks must be prepared to intervene if needed. After all, cryptocurrencies piggyback on the institutional infrastructure that serves the wider financial system, gaining a semblance of legitimacy from their links to it. This clearly falls under central banks’ area of responsibility. The buck stops here. But the buck also starts here. Credible money will continue to arise from central bank decisions, taken in the light of day and in the public interest. In particular, central banks and financial authorities should pay special attention to two aspects. First, to the ties linking cryptocurrencies to real currencies, to ensure that the relationship is not parasitic. And second, to the level playing field principle. This means “same risk, same regulation”. And no exceptions allowed.
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A Decentralised Health & Sports Economy Based on Blockchain BolttCoin Event

About BolttCoin
Boltt Coin is designed as the ultimate digital health currency for the masses. BolltCoin tokens can be mined exclusively through physical activity ie the number of steps taken by users, acting as a mining means for increasing their double investment ? in both their health and wealth. The BolltCoin tokens will disruptthe cryptocurrency scene, targeting to become the largest traded digital token within an internal ecosystem, right after Bitcoin and Ethereum as it aims at taking crypto currency mainstream. The Boltt coin health ecosystem includes challenges, tournaments, marketplace; a mobile wallet; a payment solution, and a personalized global health ID, issued for each user. The company has already created an exhaustive partner network, which counts over 25,000 merchants and in excess of 1 million products affiliated with the platform.
Events BolttCoin
https://bolttcoin.io/
https://bolttcoin.io/BolttCoinWhitePaper-V1.0.pdf
submitted by danilhadiwinata to CryptocurrencyICO [link] [comments]

NFL Playoff Pick'Em Reddit Challenge [Super Bowl]

Here we are, the Super Bowl. Beyond this competition thread I would like to take time to thank this whole sub for their contributions throughout the NFL season.
Last week to settle this thing out! Looks like the #1 spot has thinned out a bit with only 4 redditors remaining perfect throughout the competition.
Check the updated standings Here and let me know of any discrepancies. Those who missed a week but came back this past conference championship weekend have not been tallied.
For bragging rights and...
the graciously donated top prize of a 0.06 Bitcoin Free Bet on Nitrogensports.eu by our mod and saviour stander414 approx. value - 50$
Superbowl Sunday
Sunday, February 5th
6:30P ET New England Patriots vs. Atlanta Falcons
Enjoy the game and best of luck in your bets!
submitted by ReeferBandit3rd to sportsbook [link] [comments]

Please give feedback, we want to host a quality event

Hello Bitcoin Community,
I'm helping run a conference in Atlanta called TABConf (tabconf.com). We were planning on having a Bitcoin Cash presentation along with a panel debate of Bitcoin vs Bitcoin Cash. I would love recommendations for the best people to have on stage. (Would love to have Ver if he's willing to come). Would also like the coinspice people and more. Please help me get the word out. We have already sold tickets for Bitcoin Cash, hope to sell more. (Very cheap Tickets btw)!
Thanks for your support!
submitted by miketwenty1 to btc [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Cash Speaker(s) to TABConf

Hello Bitcoin Cash Community,
I'm helping run a conference in Atlanta called TABConf (tabconf.com). We were planning on having a Bitcoin Cash presentation along with a panel debate of Bitcoin vs Bitcoin Cash. I would love recommendations for the best people to have on stage. (Would love to have Ver if he's willing to come). Would also like the coinspice people and more. Please help me get the word out. We have already sold tickets for Bitcoin Cash, hope to sell more. (Very cheap Tickets btw)!
Thanks for your support!
submitted by miketwenty1 to Bitcoincash [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Kid - YouTube Bitcoin Crypto-Currency Conference Atlanta Blockchain Conferences - YouTube

good starting points are Athey et al. (2016) and Böhme et al. (2015). For a game-theoretic analysis of Bitcoin mining, a good starting point is Biais et al. (2017). Other helpful references include the original Bitcoin paper, Nakamoto (2008), the website Bitcoin.org (especially its Bitcoin Developer Guide), and, for a textbook length The most complete list of every blockchain and cryptocurrency conference around the world, with ratings! Our custom Bitcoin Market Journal Score is calculated by the number of attendees, ticket price, and quality of speakers. Use it as a guide for which conferences to attend in 2020. What does The Atlanta Blockchain do? We educate the community about decentralized crypto technologies via our events! Meetups. Our monthly Meetups are free for everyone. We have industry leaders give presentations on various crypto topics! Workshops. For more than just a high level presentation, our workshops go into detail about various topics in 3-5 hour sessions. TabConf. Full day(s) of ... In 2013, Atlanta hosted the second national conference in the country on the topic of Bitcoin. The Atlanta Bitcoin Embassy builds off the beautiful experience in Tel Aviv, Kiev, Helsinki, Panama, Amsterdam, New York, and Prague to host lectures, promote and defend crypto, talk to the press, and foster growth in this sector. Such embassies are essential to the community of coders, investors ... The cryptocurrency conference in Atlanta begins in Atlanta today. I’ll be blogging about it, and introducing you to some interesting people and speakers, so keep an eye out. The conference has a lot of interesting talks from a lot of interesting people. If you’re unable to attend, you should get a video pass, so you can watch the talks. I’ll be discussing the talks in more detail as and ...

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Bitcoin Kid - YouTube

Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube. Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube. The Bitcoin Kid interview with Jeffrey Tucker. Discussed during the interview are issues ranging from the recent Bitcoin Atlanta 2013 conference, Laissez Faire book publishing, Mount Doom and the ... Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube. Blockchain & Bitcoin Conference is a series of blockchain conferences held across the globe by Smile-Expo. Cryptocurrency regulation, prospects of FinTech and GovTech, ICO from the perspective of ...

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